Wellness Warriors – UNITY, Inc.

NUC EC Passes a Resolution to Reaffirm I Will Live Campaign for 2021

In efforts to bring further attention to suicide prevention in the midst of the global Pandemic, the National UNITY Council reaffirmed the “I Will Live” Initiative during the 2021 Business Meeting.  The NUC encourages all UNITY affiliated Youth Councils to share updated resources with their communities. The EC aims to inspire collective action, to bring about Native wellness and empower others to actively pursue a balanced lifestyle.
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NUC Passes Resolution to support Native LGBTQ2S+ and Allies COVID-19 Impacts Study

UNITY is partnering with Bowman Performance Consulting (BPC) is seeking Native youth to be heard, and seen through a study that focuses on how COVID-19 impacts lives. Not only will your voices be heard, you can win up to $45 in gift cards. For more information, listen to a video presentation. Read More

The Impact of COVID-19 on Youth in Foster Care

VVHere are highlights from our conversation with Veronica V., age 24, from Santa Clara County, California. Veronica participates in iFoster’s TAY AmeriCorps program—an opportunity for transition-age foster youth (TAY) to gain the skills they need to find permanent employment once they age out of the foster care system and are on their own. In this role she connects foster youth to resources.

 

 

 

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Native Youth Resources for COVID-19

Across Indian Country, we are witnessing tribal leaders and national Native organizations taking action to protect and position Native nations to see a better tomorrow. In order to take care of others, we must first starts learn how to properly protect ourselves. Here are some resources that illustrate best practices to keep yourself safe and provide trusted information about the coronavirus itself.

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Snow Snake Games

‘Ojibweg (snake) Bibooni (Snow) Ataadiiwin (Game)’ is the Ojibwe language of the Anishinaabe. The Annual Snow Snake games were hosted by Ojibwe Charter School in the Bay Mills Indian Community. It was a freezing snowy winter day. Nonah and her brother Tyler participated. They are UNITY Alumni Josh and Sarah Homminga’s children. Nonah, beat her brother Tyler’s length in this friendly, but competitive match.
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Resources for Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month

In observance of Teen Dating Violence Awareness Month, UNITY is sharing Healthy Native Youth’s resources that will help you promote healthy relationships and deliver sexual health programming to youth in your community, virtually and in-person.

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I would be lost without my culture

Healing Indigenous Lives Youth Submission: Natane Pelkey, Cheyenne and Arapaho

By sharing my experience of getting through hard times and my mental health struggles, I can help other native youth who may be going through similar situations. I was put into the Child Services when I was young. It honestly is a struggle to talk about it even to this day. Growing up without parents can be very hard. Around 9 years old, my sister and I were taken away from our mother in Oklahoma after we moved to escape my father’s abuse in Iowa. We were placed with our grandparents who helped shape who I am today. #NativeYouthVoices

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Learn with Alumni: Healing Through Sport

Look at healing properties of sport and traditional games with UNITY Alumni Robert Johnston.  As some sporting events and gatherings have been postponed, join Coach Rob in examining the origins of the wellness foundation built into our indigenous identities. Robert works closely with the Native Wellness Institute. The Native Wellness Institute exists to promote the well-being of Native people through programs and trainings that embrace the teachings and traditions of our ancestors.

When I learned to love the desert, I learned to love myself

UNITY Healing Indigenous Lives Youth Submission: Damien Carlos
My whole life until I was fifteen, I didn’t know much of anything about my culture besides the fact that I belonged to the Tohono O’odham tribe. I knew nothing about where I came from. I went to schools on and off the reservation. My family dealt with alcoholism. I was in a dark place for a long time. When I was fifteen I moved back to the reservation and found people that were willing to take me places to learn about my culture. I learned songs, stories, and helped in ceremonies. I haven’t looked back since. When I learned to love the Tohono (Desert), I learned to love myself. For the last two years, I’ve been working with other youth from my community that have stories similar to mine to create a program to create opportunities for more youth to experience and learn out culture. I believe my culture saved my life and can help many more kids. Read More

Thomas Henry’s vision for Saginaw Chippewa

Youth Leader Submission: Boozhoo Ginewanakwad ndiznikaaz miishiks ndoodem, Mount Pleasat nidojiba. Hello my spirit name is Golden Eagle Cloud, I am of the Turtle Clan and live in Mount Pleasant. My English name is Thomas Rae Henry, attending Mount Pleasant High School. As a member of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan, I enjoy running, playing guitar, skateboarding, and dancing at powwows. My interests are in fashion, native culture, traditional foods and medicines, our native language, politics, and economics. I run cross country and track and am the oldest sibling in my family. I take pride in having two sisters and a little brother who look up to me. I set a good example for the native youth in my community living a drug and alcohol free life. Read More